St Ethelburga

St Ethelburga

St Ethelburga

The church of St Ethelburga was originally built in around 1250, possibly on the site of an even older, Saxon, church, and extended in 1390, and again in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.  It was undamaged  in the Great Fire of 1666, although nonetheless restored in 1861-2, and again in 1912,  only to be severely damaged by an IRA bomb on 24th April, 1993. It was then substantially rebuilt, and reopened as a Centre for Peace and Reconciliation, focussing on the role of faith in conflict resolution, in 2002.

The west front was rebuilt using stone from the Medieval church.  “The Tent” and “Peace Garden” at the back were built at the same time,  to encourage inter-faith dialogue.

Ethelburga was the sister of the seventh-century Saxon Bishop Erkenwald.

 Entrance to Peace Garden

Entrance to Peace Garden

Tent

Tent

The church  is visited, although not entered,  on our “Aldgate, Bishopsgate and Beyond” and  “London Wall” standard walks, and on our “Medieval London”, “Medieval City Highlights” and “Lost City Highlights” themed specials.

Below are links to the other blog posts in this ongoing occasional series on the surviving medieval churches (or surviving bits of such) in the City of London. The remaining one will be added in due course as the series continues.

All Hallows Barking,   St Andrew Undershaft,    All Hallows Staining

St Helen    St Katharine Cree   (to follow – St Olave)

West front of St Ethelburga, showing the medieval stone

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Our Guided Walks” section of this web-site.  Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

6 thoughts on “St Ethelburga

  1. Pingback: St Andrew Undershaft, John Stow and “The Changing of the Quill” | The Lost City of London

  2. Pingback: The Church of All Hallows Staining | The Lost City of London

  3. Pingback: The church of All Hallows by the Tower | The Lost City of London

  4. Pingback: St  Katharine Cree | The Lost City of London

  5. Pingback: St Helen | The Lost City of London

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s