The Battle of Deptford Bridge

Commemorative plaque on Blackheath, put up on 500th anniversary of Battle

Commemorative plaque on Blackheath, put up on 500th anniversary of Battle

June 17th –  On this day in 1497, around 10000  lightly-armed Cornish rebels gathered on Blackheath preparatory to marching on London to protest against oppressive royal rule and punitive taxation (suspension of the privileges of the “Stannary Charter” of 1305).  Unfortunately for them, they failed to rally  any support there from the Kentish, who were rightly fearful of a reprisal of the sort that had been meted out to them for their support of the Peasants’ Revolt in 1381 and Jack Cade’s rebellion in 1450.  It was thus a comparatively  weak force, diluted by desertion,  that eventually lighted out  for London, and certainly one that was easily crushed by the king’s 20000-strong professional army  at the Battle of Deptford Bridge.

Contemporary records indicate that between two hundred and two thousand Cornishmen were killed in the battle, along with between eight and three hundred of the king’s men.  The principal rebel leaders   Michael Joseph the Smith (An Gof) and Thomas Flamank were captured at the battle and executed at Tyburn ten days later, whereupon their heads were put up on pike-staffs on London Bridge.  Flamank was quoted as saying  “Speak the truth and only then can you be free of your chains”.  Nonetheless, the persecution and pauperisation of the Cornish continued for many years to come.

The Cornish Revolt is discussed on our “Rebellious London” themed special.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Guided Walks” section of this web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

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