Chingford

Chingford was first recorded as Cingefort (sic) in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as Chingeford in 1181, probably taking its name from the Old English cingel, meaning shingle, and ford, and alluding to an ancient crossing-point on the River Lea.

The church of All Saints (see below) was originally built here in the late eleventh or twelfth century, and what is now known as Elizabeth I’s Hunting Lodge (see below) in the sixteenth.

What was once Larks Hall farmhouse and is now a public house also dates to the sixteenth century.  Sadly, though, Pimps Hall, acquired by George Monoux of Walthamstow in 1538, was substantially demolished in 1989, with only the dovecot surviving.

Church of All Saints

The church of All Saints was originally built in the late eleventh or twelfth century, on land owned by  the Dean and Chapter of St Paul’s, and extended in the late thirteenth and fourteenth.  It was subsequently substantially rebuilt in the fifteenth, extended again in the sixteenth, and rebuilt again in the twentieth, in 1930.  The north wall probably dates to the late eleventh or twelfth century, the south aisle and arcade to the late thirteenth, the tower to the fourteenth, and the porch to the sixteenth.

Elizabeth I’s Hunting Lodge

What is now known as Elizabeth I’s Hunting Lodge was actually originally built by Henry VIII between  1542-43, before Elizabeth became queen, in the then heart of Epping Forest.  It now houses a museum featuring many original fixtures and fittings as well as Tudor period artefacts.

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