Hackney

Another in the occasional series on “Far-Flung Lost London” …

Hackney was first recorded in 1198 as Hakeneia,  in 1222, from the  Old English personal name Haca, and eg, referring to an island in or peninsula on the River Lea.  The area fell under the Viking Danelaw in Saxon  times, lying east of the aforementioned River Lea, which marked its western boundary.   In the post-Medieval period, it became a popular location for aristocratic country houses (see October 25th, 2013 posting on “Sutton House”).  It remained semi-rural until as recently as the nineteenth century.

Church of St Augustine

The church of St Augustine was originally built here sometime before 1275, possibly on the site of and older, Norman or even Saxon church.    It was subsequently rededicated to St John sometime between 1660 and 1790, and substantially demolished between 1797-98, after a  new church dedicated to St John was built nearby.  Only the tower survives.

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