“There I would go …  and quietly call to him” (Ann Fanshawe, 1653)

Another in the occasional series on contemporary – “pen-portrait” – accounts of events in the history of London, this one written by Ann Fanshawe regarding her Royalist husband Sir Richard Fanshawe’s imprisonment in London following his capture by Parliamentarians at the Civil War Battle of Worcester in 1651:

“During the time of his imprisonment, I failed not constantly to go, when the clock struck four in the morning, and with a dark lantern in my hand all alone and on foot, from my lodging in Chancery Lane … to Whitehall, in at the entry that went out of King Street and onto the bowling-green.  There I would go under his window and quietly call to him.  He, that after the first time expected me, never  failed to put out his head at the first call; thus we talked together, and sometimes I was so wet with the rain, that it went in at my neck and out at my heels.  He directed me how I should make my addresses, which I did ever to their general, Cromwell … ”.

Sir_Richard_Fanshawe,_1st_Baronet.jpeg

Sir Richard was duly released by Cromwell.  He went on after the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 to resume his political and diplomatic career, serving as Ambassador to Portugal and Spain.  He died in Madrid in 1666, whereupon  his body was brought back to England for burial.

The Civil War and its aftermath are discussed on  various of our standard walk, including the “Rebellious London” themed special.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Guided Walks” section of this web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, or by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com).

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