Category Archives: London Churches

All Hallows on the Wall

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

ahlw

All Hallows-on-the-Wall (“28” on sixteenth-century “Agas” map/Map of Early Modern London) was originally built around 1120.

All Hallows London Wall exterior

All Hallows London Wall interior

All Hallows memorial

The church was undamaged in the Great Fire of 1666.  My distant ancestor Simon West, was married here, for the third time, in 1677.

The church was  subsequently rebuilt  by George Dance the Younger in 1765-67, and further modified in the late  nineteenth century. The rebuilt church had to be  restored twice in the twentieth century,  after sustaining bomb damage   during  both the Second  World War of the early part, and  the IRA terror campaign of the late.

The font was salvaged from St Mary Magdalen, Old Fish Street.

All Hallows Staining

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

ahs

All Hallows Staining (reverse “C” on sixteenth-century “Agas” map/Map of Early Modern London) was originally built  around 1177, and rebuilt in the fourteenth  or fifteenth century (sources differ) .

 

61PP9+hR5tL._AC_

The church was undamaged   in the Great Fire of 1666, but large parts of it  collapsed  in 1671, and it was subsequently rebuilt in 1674-5, only to be substantially demolished in 1870 (the year this etching was made).    The parish was then merged with that of St Olave Hart Street.

a-The-title-page-of-a-1665-compilation-of-the-Bills-of-Mortality

Bill_of_Mortality

It is thought that the collapse of 1671 was due to undermining of the foundations by burials following the “Great Plague” of 1665.  The “Bills of Mortality” show that 112 parishioners died of the plague in 1665, most of them in the late summer or early autumn.

all-hallows-staining

The  fourteenth- or fifteenth- century tower still stands, thanks to the initiative of the Clothworkers’ Company, who were also responsible for restoring it in 1873.  The foundations are  original, twelfth-century.  The crypt is also twelfth-century, although it has been transported from its original location in the chapel of St James-in-the-Wall.  Two sword-rests salvaged from All Hallows can be seen in St Olave Hart Street, a third in St Andrew Undershaft.

 

All Hallows Lombard Street

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

ahls

All Hallows Lombard Street (“H” on sixteenth-century “Agas” map/Map of Early Modern London) was originally built sometime between 1052-1070, and rebuilt between 1516 and 1544.

Hallows_lombard_godwin

The church was subsequently burned down   in the Great Fire of 1666,  and rebuilt by Wren in 1686-94, only to be allowed to fall into disrepair, and declared an unsafe structure and demolished in 1938-39, when the parish was merged with St Edmund.

Lost Wren Churches

It  is one of the twenty-one lost Wren churches.

All Hallows Lombard Street (1)

Only parish boundary markers survive at its former site.

All Hallows Twickenham

Some of the fabric and furnishings survive in the church of All Hallows in  Twickenham, including the rebuilt tower.

All Hallows the Less

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

ahtl

All Hallows the Less (“M” on sixteenth-century “Agas” map/Map of Early Modern London) was originally built in the early or mid thirteenth century, at least in part over a vault or cellar, such that it was  referred to as Omn’ Scor’ super Celar in Pope Nicholas IV’s Taxatio Ecclesiastica of 1291.  It was repaired and partially rebuilt around the turn of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

The church was subsequently burned down in the Great Fire, and never rebuilt,  the parish merging with that of All Hallows the Great.

Site_of_All_Hallows_the_Less_1966

Essentially nothing now remains of the church at its former site, the churchyard having been damaged by bombing in the Second World War, and lost to post-war redevelopment.

All Hallows the Less (site of)

However, the name lives on,  in that of Allhallows Lane.

 

All Hallows Honey Lane

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

Bee, Honey Lane

All Hallows Honey Lane (not shown on sixteenth-century “Agas” map/Map of Early Modern London) was originally built around the turn of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, the oldest record of it being in  a deed dating to between 1191 and 1212.  By the early sixteenth century, the church was known for its Lutheran leanings, and in 1540, its curate, Thomas Garret or Gerrard, was burned at the stake  at Smithfield for heresy.  It was described by Stow in his “Survay of London” of 1598 as a “small parish church”, with “no monuments … worth the noting”.  The church was subsequently burned down in the Great Fire of 1666, and never rebuilt, and the parish was merged with that of St Mary-le-Bow.

All Hallows Honey Lane (1)

Only parish boundary markers survive  at  its former site.  However, some “Anglo-Norman” structures were uncovered during post-fire redevelopment, and a twelfth-century column  capital in the  form of a serpent, possibly from the church, was salvaged, and may now be seen in the  British Museum.  Buried human remains  were uncovered during archaeological excavations at No. 111 Cheapside in 1954-5.

 

All Hallows the Great

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

All Hallows the Great

The church of All Hallows the Great (“V” on sixteenth-century “Agas” Map/”Map of Early Modern London”) was originally built in around 1235.

36318

Wren’s_All_Hallows_the_Great,_John_Crowther,_1884

The church was subsequently burned down  in the Great Fire of 1666,  and rebuilt by Wren in 1677-84, only to be demolished between 1876 and 1894,  when the parish was merged with St Michael Paternoster Royal.

lost-wren-churches-e1413241207284

It  is one of the twenty-one lost Wren churches, and one of the ten lost between 1860 (“Union of Benefices Act”)  and 1900.

Essentially nothing now remains of it  at its former site, other than the name, which lives on in that of Allhallows Lane (the last vestige, the churchyard, having been   lost during the construction of the City Fire Station).

098 - Copy

Note, though, that the salvaged  chancel screen survives,  in St Margaret, Lothbury.  Salvaged statues of Moses and Aaron, and a carved figure of Charity, also survive,  in St Michael Paternoster Royal.

 

 

All Hallows Bread Street

Another in the series on historic churches in the City of London …

By the time of the Great Fire of London in 1666, there were over a hundred parish churches and other places of Christian worship within and immediately without the walls of  the City, despite a number having been closed down during the Reformation. To be precise, according to  Parish Clerks’ records, there were 97 churches within the walls of the City, and 16 without, making a total of 113.

bla

All Hallows Bread Street (reverse “5” on “sixteenth-century “Agas” Map/”Map of Early Modern London”) was originally built in the thirteenth  century, sometime before 1291, being mentioned in the “Taxatio Ecclesiastica” of Pope Nicholas IV of that year.   John Milton was christened in the church  in 1608.

Hallows_bread_godwin

The church was subsequently burned down in the Great Fire of 1666,  and rebuilt by Wren in 1681-98, only to be  demolished in 1877,  when the parish was merged with St Mary-le-Bow.

lost-wren-churches-e1413241207284

It is one of the twenty-one lost Wren churches, and one of the ten lost between 1860 (“Union of Benefices Act”)  and 1900.

All Hallows Bread Street (site of)

Only a  plaque on the wall of St Mary-le-Bow and some parish boundary markers survive  at  its former site.  The salvaged pulpit also survives,  in St Vedast, Foster Lane.