Category Archives: Series: Lost churches (initially survived)

St Peter-le-Poer

Another in the  occasional series on churches that survived the Great Fire of 1666 but were rebuilt or demolished subsequently …

St Peter-le-Poer - as engraved by John Le Keux in 1839

St Peter-le-Poer – as engraved by John Le Keux in 1839

St Peter-le-Poer  was originally built around 1181, incorporated into the priory church of Austin Friars Priory as a private chapel around 1265,  then separated from it again after the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538 (the remaining part of the priory church then becoming the Dutch Church), and extended  in 1615-31.  It was undamaged in the Great Fire of 1666 (although ash from the fire settled on an open prayer book in the church, and obscured the text), but later fell into disrepair, and had to be repaired in 1716 and rebuilt in 1788-92, only to be demolished in 1907-08, when the parish was merged with St Michael Cornhill.  Nothing now remains of the church at its former site, at 109-118 Broad Street, although the salvaged pulpit and font still survive, in the church of St Peter-le-Poer in Friern Barnet.

St Peter-le-Poer parish boundary marker, Throgmorton Street

St Peter-le-Poer parish boundary marker, Throgmorton Street

Site of St Peter le Poer, Broad Street

Site of St Peter le Poer, Broad Street

St Martin Outwich

Another in the  occasional series on churches that survived the Great Fire of 1666 but were rebuilt or demolished subsequently …

St Martin Outwich memorial in City of London cemetery

St Martin Outwich memorial in City of London cemetery

St Martin Outwich was originally built sometime before 1291 (it is mentioned in Pope Nicholas IV’s “Taxatio Ecclesiastica” of that year).  It was undamaged  in the  Great Fire of 1666, but severely damaged in a fire of 1765, and rebuilt by Samuel P. Cockerell between 1796-8, only to be demolished in 1874, when the parish was merged with St Helen Bishopsgate (and the dead from the churchyard were reinterred in the City of London Cemetery in East End).

St Martin Outwich in 1830

St Martin Outwich in 1830

St Martin Outwich plaque on Threadneedle Street

St Martin Outwich plaque on Threadneedle Street

A Corporation “Blue Plaque  marks the former site of St Martin’s, on Threadneedle Street.

Late fourteenth- or early fifteenth- century alabaster effigies of Sir John de Oteswich and his wife were salvaged from the church, and still survive,  in St Helen’s, on Bishopsgate.

Oteswich memorial, St Helen

Oteswich memorial, St Helen

St Katherine Coleman

St Katherine Coleman

Another in the occasional series on churches that survived the Great Fire of 1666 but were rebuilt or demolished subsequently …

St Katherine Coleman blue plaque

St Katherine Coleman blue plaque

St Katherine Coleman was originally built around 1346, restored in 1489, and extended in 1624.  It survived the  Great Fire of 1666, but was rebuilt by James Horne in 1739-40, in the “Vernacular Palladian” style, and  demolished in 1925, when the parish was merged with St Olave Hart Street.

Part of the former churchyard survives, and a Corporation “Blue Plaque” marks the former site of the church.

Photograph of St Katherine Coleman

Photograph of St Katherine Coleman

St James Dukes Place

Another in the  occasional series on churches that survived the Great Fire of 1666 but were rebuilt or demolished subsequently …

Print of St James Dukes Place

Print of St James Dukes Place

St James Duke’s Place was originally built in 1622, on land that before the dissolution used to belong to Holy Trinity Priory.  It survived the Great Fire of 1666, but fell into disrepair and had to be rebuilt in 1727, only  to be demolished in 1874, when the parish was merged with St Katharine Cree.  Essentially nothing now remains of the church at its former site, other than the name, which lives on in that of St James’s Passage, and some parish boundary markers in Creechurch Lane and in St Katharine Cree churchyard in Mitre Street. Some memorial plaques salvaged from the church survive in St Katharine Cree.

 

St James Dukes Place plaque in St Katharine Cree

St James Dukes Place plaque in St Katharine Cree

St James Dukes Place parish boundary marker, St Katharine Cree churchyard

St James Dukes Place parish boundary marker, St Katharine Cree churchyard

All Hallows London Wall

All Hallows memento mori

All Hallows memento mori

The first article in an  occasional series on churches that survived the Great Fire of 1666 but were rebuilt or demolished subsequently …

All Hallows London Wall was originally built in around 1120.  It survived the Great Fire of 1666, but was rebuilt by George Dance the Younger in 1765-67.

It was further modified in the late nineteenth century; rebuilt in 1960-62, after sustaining damage in the German bombing of the Second  World War II;  and restored in 1993, after sustaining further damage in the IRA bombing campaign of that year.

All Hallows memorial

All Hallows memorial

All Hallows London Wall interior

All Hallows London Wall interior

All Hallows London Wall exterior

All Hallows London Wall exterior