Guided Walks

Explore the history of The Lost City of London on one of our Standard Walks, which cover particular areas of the City of London or its surroundings, or on one of our Themed Specials, which deal with specific eras or themes (follow links for further details).

Key features of all our walks include:

Small groups;

Friendly interaction; and

“The Satchel of Secrets”.

Costs

Our walks are generally of three to four miles, last two to three hours, and cost £8 (concessions £6) per head. Note, though, that the extended “Medieval London” and “Post-Medieval (Tudor and Stuart) London” themed specials are of twelve miles, last six to eight hours and cost £16 (concs £12) per head.  

Concessionary rates are available for young adults aged 16-18, whether or not in full-time education; students; unwaged; and “super-adults” aged over 65.  

Walks are free for children aged 11-16 if each is accompanied by a paying adult.  

They are unsuitable for children under 11.

Bookings

Dates and timings of walks are based on your preferences (and on our availability).  Please note in this context that not all of the sites on all the walks are accessible at all times (for example, the Inns of Court are closed at weekends).

If you would like to book a walk with us, please simply let us know which one, and on which date, and we’ll take it from there.  No pre-payment is required.

You can choose either to keep your walk private, to you and your party, or to have us make it public (the  cost is the same in either case).

Party sizes are restricted to a maximum of 6-8 persons, to enable everyone to get the most out of the experience.

For further information, or to book, please:

E-mail lostcityoflondon@sky.com;

or

Complete the  electronic form here.

Note

Participants on our walks are responsible for their own safety while on our walks.  

We are covered by public liability insurance.

222 thoughts on “Guided Walks

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