Themed Specials

Our Themed Specials (details below) are generally of three to four miles, last two to three hours, and cost £8 (concessions £6) per head. Note, though, that the extended “Medieval London” and “Tudor and Stuart London” ones are of twelve miles, last six to eight hours and cost £16 (concs £12) per head.  Note also that the “Shakespeare’s London” one is of six miles, lasts three to four hours, and costs £12 (concs £9) per head.  Concessionary rates are available for young adults aged 17-18, whether or not in full-time education; students; unwaged; and “super-adults” aged over 65.  Walks are free for children aged 11-16 if each is accompanied by a paying adult.  They are unsuitable for children under 11.

Dates and timings of walks are based on your preferences (and on our availability). Please note in this context that not all of the sites on all the walks are accessible at all times (for example, the Inns of Court are closed at weekends).  If you would like to book a walk with us, please simply let us know which one, and on which date, and we’ll take it from there.  No pre-payment is required.  You can choose either to keep your walk private, to you and your party, or to have us make it public (the  cost is the same in either case).  Party sizes are restricted to a maximum of 6 persons, to enable everyone to get the most out of the experience.

For further information, or to book, please:

E-mail lostcityoflondon@sky.com;

or

Complete the  electronic form here.

 

* Roman London 

Starts at Blackfriars Tube and finishes at Tower Hill.  See all the key Roman sites of the City, including the City Wall, the Amphitheatre, the Temple of Mithras, the Governor’s Palace, and the Basilica and Forum.

* Dark Age [Saxon and Viking] London 

dark-age-london-walk

Starts at Temple Tube and finishes at Tower Hill.  Covers all the major Dark Age sites of  the City of London and the immediately adjoining part of Westminster.  Hear of the fascinating Dark Age history of the area.  See, among other things, City churches with Saxon and Viking origins, surviving Saxon stone-work, and two sainted Vikings.  Walk in the footsteps of Alfred the Great along the Saxon water-front.  Discover the link between the Norse Sagas and a much-loved London nursery rhyme.

* Medieval London  (NB: lasts  6-8 hours (with rest and refreshment stops); and costs £16/ concs £12)  

medieval-churches

Starts at Liverpool Street Tube and finishes at Westminster.  Covers all the Medieval sites not only of the City but also of Spitalfields, Southwark, Smithfield, Clerkenwell, Holborn and Westminster.  Discover, among other things, the bloody Tower, a Medieval cathedral and abbey, all the surviving Medieval parish churches, all the surviving vestiges of the Medieval monastic houses, a “Black Death” burial ground, the final resting place of the “Outcast Dead”, the original seat of Parliament, and the mythical “London Stone”.

* Medieval City Highlights

A condensed version of the above walk, concentrating on sites within the  walls of the City. Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at Blackfriars.

* Chaucer’s London

Chaucer's London - Copy

Starts in the area around Baynard’s Castle and the King’s Wardrobe in Blackfriars, with views up the Thames towards Westminster.  Proceeds through the heart of the Medieval City of London to its eastern quarter, where many pre-Great Fire buildings still survive.  And thence in Chaucer’s footsteps from his sometime lodgings in Aldgate to his sometime place of work in Billingsgate.  Finished by crossing London Bridge to the Borough of Southwark, and continuing down Borough High Street as far as Tabard Street, along part of the route taken by the pilgrims he wrote about in his “Canterbury Tales“.

* Tudor and Stuart London  (NB: lasts 6-8 hours (with rest and refreshment stops); and costs £16/ concs £12)  

Starts at Old Street Tube and finishes at Westminster.  Covers all the Tudor and Stuart sites not only of  the City but also of Shoreditch, Spitalfields, Southwark, Smithfield, Clerkenwell, Holborn and Westminster.  Discover, among other things, all the surviving vestiges of the Tudor and  Stuart play-houses and theatres, the “Office of the Revels”, the “Inns of Court”, the “handsomest barn in England”, the remains of royal palaces, the banqueting house where a king lost his head, the tavern where a queen danced round a cherry tree, and the site of the first coffee shop in town.

* Tudor and Stuart City Highlights

A condensed version of the above walk, concentrating on sites within the walls of the City. Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at Blackfriars.

* Shakespeare’s London (NB:  lasts 3-4 hours, and costs £12/concs £9)  

Summary

Starts at the “Actors’ Church” in Shoreditch, and proceeds to the sites of the Shoreditch playhouses of the 1570s, and through the Liberty of Norton Folgate, to enter the City of London at Bishopsgate.  Thence past the sites of inns that functioned as playhouses before any were purpose-built, that of a church frequented by Shakespeare’s fellow actors Heminge and Condell,  and that of the most famous of his lodgings, to that of the Mermaid Tavern,  where he was once wont to gather of an evening with Marlowe and Jonson.  And by way of “Old” London Bridge to Southwark, to the Cathedral where his brother lies buried, and, through the Liberty of the Clink, to the sites of the Bankside playhouses of the 1580s and 1590s.  Finishes with a walk across a wobbly footbridge to the sites of the indoor Blackfriars theatres, one once filled with candlelight and sweet music as well as the Bard’s immortal words.  With an optional extension to the site of the premiere of “Twelfth Night” in 1602.

* The Great Fire of London and its aftermath

Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at St Paul’s. See all the key sites associated with the Great Fire of London, from Pudding Lane to Pye Corner.  Hear in the words of those who witnessed it how it started, spread and finally stopped, a little short of the Tower to the east and St Bartholomew’s to the west.  Discover who was held responsible; where, beneath a symbolic Phoenix, a fire-damaged relic still stands; and how the City  that might have been never came to be.

 

81 thoughts on “Themed Specials

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