Themed Specials

Our Themed Specials (details below) are generally of three to four miles, last two to three hours, and cost £8 (concessions £6) per head. Note, though, that the extended “Medieval London” and “Post-Medieval (Tudor and Stuart) London” ones are of twelve miles, last six to eight hours and cost £16 (concs £12) per head. Concessionary rates are available for young adults aged 16-18, whether or not in full-time education; students; unwaged; and “super-adults” aged over 65.  Walks are free for children aged 11-16 if each is accompanied by a paying adult.  They are unsuitable for children under 11.

Dates and timings of walks are based on your preferences (and on our availability). Please note in this context that not all of the sites on all the walks are accessible at all times (for example, the Inns of Court are closed at weekends).  If you would like to book a walk with us, please simply let us know which one, and on which date, and we’ll take it from there.  No pre-payment is required.  You can choose either to keep your walk private, to you and your party, or to have us make it public (the  cost is the same in either case).  Party sizes are restricted to a maximum of 6-8 persons, to enable everyone to get the most out of the experience.

For further information, or to book, please:

E-mail lostcityoflondon@sky.com;

or

Complete the  electronic form here.

 

* Roman London 

Starts at Blackfriars Tube and finishes at Tower Hill.  See all the key Roman sites of the City, including the City Wall, the Amphitheatre, the Temple of Mithras, the Governor’s Palace, and the Basilica and Forum.

* Dark Age [Saxon and Viking] London 

dark-age-london-walk

Starts at Temple Tube and finishes at Tower Hill.  Covers all the major Dark Age sites of  the City of London and the immediately adjoining part of Westminster.  Hear of the fascinating Dark Age history of the area.  See, among other things, City churches with Saxon and Viking origins, surviving Saxon stone-work, and two sainted Vikings.  Walk in the footsteps of Alfred the Great along the Saxon water-front.  Discover the link between the Norse Sagas and a much-loved London nursery rhyme.

* Medieval London – The City that Chaucer knew (NB: lasts  six to eight hours (with rest and refreshment stops); and costs £16/ concs £12)  

medieval-churches

Starts at Liverpool Street Tube and finishes at Westminster.  Covers all the Medieval sites not only of the City but also of Spitalfields, Southwark, Smithfield, Clerkenwell, Holborn and Westminster.  Discover, among other things, the bloody Tower, a Medieval cathedral and abbey, all the surviving Medieval parish churches, all the surviving vestiges of the Medieval monastic houses, a “Black Death” burial ground, the final resting place of the “Outcast Dead”, the original seat of Parliament, and the mythical “London Stone”.

* Medieval City Highlights

A condensed version of the above walk, concentrating on sites within the  walls of the City. Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at Blackfriars.

* Post-Medieval [Tudor and Stuart] London – The City that Shakespeare knew (NB: lasts six to eight hours (with rest and refreshment stops); and costs £16/ concs £12)  

Starts at Old Street Tube and finishes at Westminster.  Covers all the Tudor and Stuart sites not only of  the City but also of Shoreditch, Spitalfields, Southwark, Smithfield, Clerkenwell, Holborn and Westminster.  Discover, among other things, all the surviving vestiges of the Tudor and  Stuart play-houses and theatres, the “Office of the Revels”, the “Inns of Court”, the “handsomest barn in England”, the remains of royal palaces, the banqueting house where a king lost his head, the tavern where a queen danced round a cherry tree, and the site of the first coffee shop in town.

* Post-Medieval [Tudor and Stuart] City Highlights

A condensed version of the above walk, concentrating on sites within the walls of the City. Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at Blackfriars. 

* The Great Fire of London and its aftermath

Starts at Monument Tube and finishes at St Paul’s. See all the key sites associated with the Great Fire of London, from Pudding Lane to Pye Corner.  Hear in the words of those who witnessed it how it started, spread and finally stopped, a little short of the Tower to the east and St Bartholomew’s to the west.  Discover who was held responsible; where, beneath a symbolic Phoenix, a fire-damaged relic still stands; and how the City  that might have been never came to be.

* The Lost Wren Churches of London  

Lost Wren Churches - Copy

Starts and finishes at St Paul’s Tube.  Takes in  almost all of the churches built by Sir Christopher Wren after the Great Fire of 1666 that still survive, and the sites and stories of all of those that we have lost.

* Legal London  

Starts at St Paul’s Tube and finishes at Westminster.  See, among other things, the Central Criminal Court (the “Old Bailey”), the Inns of Court, the Royal Courts of Justice, the Supreme Court and the Houses of Parliament.

* Rebellious London (NB: generally lasts three hours)  

rebellious-london

Starts at Tower Hill Tube and finishes at Westminster.  See the sites of, and hear the stories of, the more important rebellions in London up to the time of the Great Fire of London (1666), that is, Boudicca’s Revolt (60), the Rebellion of William Longbeard (1196), the Peasants’ Revolt (1381), the Lollard Rebellion of Sir John Oldcastle (1414), Jack Cade’s Rebellion (1450), the Wars of the Roses (1455-85), the Rebellions of the Reformation and Counter-Rebellion (1534-58), Wyatt’s Rebellion (1554), Essex’s Rebellion (1601), the Gunpowder Plot (1605), the Civil War (1642-1651), and Venner’s Rebellion (1661).  At least passing reference is also made to later events, from the Gordon Riots of the eighteenth century, through the Bow Match Girls Strike of the nineteenth and the Battle of Cable Street of the twentieth, to the anti-war and anti-capitalism protests of the twenty-first.

 

43 thoughts on “Themed Specials

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