Tag Archives: Guildhall

Election of the Lord Mayor of the City of London

FitzAlwyn.JPG

Today, Michaelmas Day,  is the day of the election of the new Lord Mayor of the City of London, the leader of the City of London Corporation, in the so-called “Common Hall” in the Guildhall (*).  According to equally long-standing tradition, the new Lord Mayor will formally assume office, in the so-called “Silent Ceremony”, on the Friday before the second Saturday in November; and the Lord Mayor’s show will take place on the following day.

(*) The first (Lord) Mayor to be appointed, by King Richard I, was Henry Fitz-Ailwyn de Londonestone, in 1189.  The first to be elected by peers, under the “Mayoral Charter” of King John, was Serlo de Mercer, in 1215.  Such was the prestige of the position that  the by-then Lord Mayor, William Hardel(l), was invited by King John to be  a witness to the sealing of, and an Enforcer or Surety of, the Magna Carta, later in 1215.

City of London Buildings that survived the Great Fire of 1666

Churches

Of the 97 parish churches within the walls of the City of London at the time of the Great Fire of 1666, only 8, namely, All Hallows Barking, All Hallows Staining, St Alphage, St Andrew Undershaft, St Ethelburga, St Helen, St Katharine Cree, and St Olave Hart Street, survived,  and still survive, with at least some pre-Great Fire structures standing, above ground (*).

Tower of London

Guildhall.JPG

Of the secular buildings, only the Tower of London and the Guildhall, and parts of the Merchant Taylors’ and Apothecaries’ Livery Company Halls, and of the “Olde Wine Shades” public house, still survive.

(*) A further 5 churches, namely All Hallows on the Wall, St James Duke’s Place, St Katherine Coleman, St Martin Outwich and St Peter-le-Poer, also survived  the fire but were either rebuilt or demolished afterwards.

And 84 were burnt down in the fire, of which 49 were rebuilt afterwards, and 35 were not.

Guildhall

great-fire-window

The last  in the  series on City of London buildings that survived the Great Fire of 1666, and that still survive to this day …

The Guildhall was originally built sometime before 1128, possibly on the site of an even older building, where the Saxons held their “Husting”, or indoor assembly; and subsequently substantially rebuilt between 1298-1356, and rebuilt again, by the Master Mason John Croxton, between 1411-30.

guildhall

great-hall

horn-window

crypt

It was damaged in the Great Fire, and repaired  in the aftermath, only to be badly damaged by  bombing  in the Blitz, and repaired again after that.  The lower levels of the walls – up to the level of the clerestorey – still survive from the Medieval period, as do some of the original windows, made from slivers of  horn, and the crypts.  The porch, though, is a later, eighteenth-century addition, by Dance, in a bizarre style described as Hindoo Gothic.  Inside, the famous statues of the mythical giants Gog and Magog replace two sets of earlier ones, the first destroyed in the Great Fire, and the second in the Blitz.

 

 

 

Election of the Lord Mayor of the City of London

 

full_size_portrait

Today, Michaelmas Day,  is the day of the election of the new – 689th – Lord Mayor of the City of London, the leader of the City of London Corporation, in the so-called “Common Hall” in the Guildhall.

According to equally long-standing tradition, the new Lord Mayor will formally assume office, in the so-called “Silent Ceremony”, on the Friday before the second Saturday in November, which this year falls on the 11th; and the Lord Mayor’s show will take place on the following day, this year, the 12th.

(*) The first (Lord) Mayor to be appointed, by King Richard I, was Henry Fitz-Ailwyn de Londonestone, in 1189.  The first to be elected by peers, under the “Mayoral Charter” of King John, was Serlo de Mercer, in 1215.  Such was the prestige of the position that  the by-then Lord Mayor, William Hardel(l), was invited by King John to be  a witness to the sealing of, and an Enforcer or Surety of, the Magna Carta, later in 1215.

City of London Buildings that survived the Great Fire of 1666

Of the 97 parish churches within the walls of the City of London at the time of the Great Fire of 1666, only 8 survived the fire,  and still survive, with at least some pre-fire structures standing above ground, namely, All Hallows Barking, All Hallows Staining, St Alphage, St Andrew Undershaft, St Ethelburga, St Helen, St Katharine Cree, and St Olave Hart Street (*).

tower-of-london

guildhall

Of the secular buildings, only the Tower of London and the Guildhall, and parts of the Merchant Taylors’ and Apothecaries’ Livery Company Halls, and of the “Olde Wine Shades” public house, still survive.

(*) A further 5 churches, namely All Hallows on the Wall, St James Duke’s Place, St Katherine Coleman, St Martin Outwich and St Peter-le-Poer, also survived  the fire but were either rebuilt or demolished afterwards.

And 84 were burnt down in the fire, of which 49 were rebuilt afterwards, and 35 were not.