Tag Archives: Richard Whittington

Turn again, Whittington

Stained glass window of Whittington and his non-existent cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Stained glass window of Whittington and his cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

October 30th –  On this day in 1397 Dick Whittington became Lord Mayor of London for the first time.  Among the many public works undertaken by Whittington, in or out of public office, were the acquisition and conversion into a Market of the old Leaden Hall, on Leadenhall Street; the establishment of the College of St Spirit and St Mary, on what is now College Street, where he lived; the reconstruction of the church of St Michael Paternoster Royal, also on College Street; the reconstruction of the Guildhall; the reconstruction of Newgate Gaol at the junction of Newgate Street and Old Bailey, which had been damaged during the Peasants’ Revolt (and of which he had written “by reason of the foetid and corrupt atmosphere that is in the heinous gaol … many persons are dead who would have been alive”); and the bequest of a library valued at £400 to Christ Church Newgate Street.  Not to mention the construction of a 128-seater public lavatory!

Whittington House

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Unfortunately, most of the sites associated with Whittington were destroyed during the Great Fire of 1666.  However, he is commemorated by a Corporation “Blue Plaque” on the site of his house on College Street, by another outside the church of  St Michael Paternoster Royal,  and  by a stained glass window inside the church, depicting him and the non-existent cat that is nonetheless forever associated with him, through the fable and pantomime. The cat  is commemorated by a statue on Highgate Hill, looking back over its shoulder toward the City paved with gold…..

probably-the-worlds-only-statue-of-a-non-existent-cat-highgate-hill

Probably the world’s only statue of a non-existent cat, Highgate Hill

Probably the world's only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

And this is probably the world’s only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

Turn again, Whittington

 

Stained glass window of Whittington and his non-existent cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Stained glass window of Whittington and his cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

October 30th –  On this day in 1397 Dick Whittington became Lord Mayor of London for the first time (of three).  Among the many public works undertaken by Whittington, in or out of public office, were the acquisition and conversion into a Market of the old Leaden Hall, on Leadenhall Street; the establishment of the College of St Spirit and St Mary, on what is now College Street, where he lived; the reconstruction of the church of St Michael Paternoster Royal, also on College Street; the reconstruction of the Guildhall; the reconstruction of Newgate Gaol at the junction of Newgate Street and Old Bailey, which had been damaged during the Peasants’ Revolt (and of which he had written “by reason of the foetid and corrupt atmosphere that is in the heinous gaol … many persons are dead who would have been alive”); and the bequest of a library valued at £400 to Christ Church Newgate Street.  Not to mention the construction of a 128-seater public lavatory!

Whittington House

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Unfortunately, most of the sites associated with Whittington were destroyed during the Great Fire of 1666.  However, he is commemorated by a Corporation “Blue Plaque” on the site of his house on College Street, by another outside the church of  St Michael Paternoster Royal,  and  by a stained glass window inside the church, depicting him and the non-existent cat that is nonetheless forever associated with him, through the fable and pantomime. The cat  is commemorated by a statue on Highgate Hill, looking back over its shoulder toward the City paved with gold…..

probably-the-worlds-only-statue-of-a-non-existent-cat-highgate-hill

Probably the world’s only statue of a non-existent cat, Highgate Hill

Probably the world's only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

And this is probably the world’s only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

“Naming and shaming” of public nuisances in Medieval London (General Court of the Mayor of the City of London, 1422)

Coat of arms of Chichele family

Another in the occasional series on contemporary accounts and descriptions of the historic City of  London, this one from the transactions of the General Court of the Mayor, Robert Chichele,  for 1422 …

“There are nuisances … in the ward of Faringdon Without …

First, that the master of Ludgate often puts out dung in the … gutter and stops the water from flowing, to the great nuisance of all the folk passing there.  …   Also William Emery, horsedealer, often lays much dung in the high street and allows it to lie … .  Also the pavements before … the door of Harry Gras, barber, and … Walsh’s door, are defective and need to be mended.  … Also that John Taverner … is not a freeman of the city.  Also John Whitlok … and his wife and common bauds, and therefore have lately been put out of other wards.  Also John Swayn and his wife are forestallers, regrators, and extortioners often, , and especially lately they … paid  to [a] Boatman only 26d for 30 loads, whereas he should have been paid for every burden 3d and because of this … made much noise and open slander.  Also the taverners of St Bride’s parish set their empty tuns and pipes in the high street … ”.

Coat of arms of Chichele family

Coat of arms of Chichele family

Robert Chichele, a grocer, was Mayor twice: 1411-12 and 1421-22,

Turn again, Whittington

Stained glass window of Whittington and his non-existent cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Stained glass window of Whittington and his non-existent cat, St Michael Paternoster Royal

October 30th –   On this day in 1397 Dick Whittington became Lord Mayor of London for the first time (of three).  Among the many public works undertaken by Whittington, in or out of public office, were the acquisition and conversion into a Market of the old Leaden  Hall, on Leadenhall Street; the establishment of the College of St Spirit and St Mary, on what is now College Street, where he lived; the reconstruction of the church of St Michael Paternoster Royal, also on College Street; the reconstruction of the Guildhall; the reconstruction of Newgate Gaol at the junction of Newgate Street and Old Bailey, which had been damaged during the Peasants’ Revolt (and of which he had written “by reason of the foetid and corrupt atmosphere that is in the heinous gaol … many persons are dead who would have been alive”); and the bequest of a library valued at £400 to Christ Church Newgate Street.  Not to mention the construction of a 128-seater public lavatory!

Unfortunately, most of the sites associated with Whittington were destroyed during the Great Fire of 1666.  However, he is commemorated by a Corporation “Blue Plaque” on the site of his house on College Street, by another outside the church of  St Michael Paternoster Royal,  and  by a stained glass window inside the church, depicting him and the non-existent cat that is nonetheless forever associated with him, through the fable and pantomime.  The cat  is commemorated by a statue on Highgate Hill, looking back over it’s shoulder toward the City paved with gold.

Probably the world's only statue of a non-existent cat,  Highgate Hill

Probably the world’s only statue of a non-existent cat, Highgate Hill

Probably the world's only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

Probably the world’s only piece of topiary in the form of a non-existent cat (looking a bit bedraggled), Whittington Park, Upper Holloway

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster Royal

Whittington plaque, St Michael Paternoster RoyalWhittington HouseWhittington House