Tag Archives: Rump Parliament

Civil War and Commonwealth

Houses of Parliament.JPG

On this day in 1649,  at what was effectively the end of the Civil War, the Long Parliament passed an Act making England  a Commonwealth and Free State “where Parliament would constitute the officers and ministers of the people without any kings or lords”.

Various sites associated with the Civil War and Commonwealth are visited on various of our walks, including the “Tudor and Stuart London”, “Tudor and Stuart City Highlights” and “Rebellious London” themed specials.

Further details of all our walks are available in the Our Guided Walks section of this web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, or by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com).

Civil War and Commonwealth

 

 

According to Peter de Loriol’s endlessly fascinating “The London Book of Days”, on this day in 1649,  at what was effectively the end of the Civil War, “the Rump Parliament passed an Act … which created all people of the realm and territories of England a Commonwealth and Free State where Parliament would constitute the officers and ministers of the people without any kings or lords”.

Various sites associated with the Civil War and Commonwealth are visited on our “St Paul’s to Westminster Abbey”, “Aldgate, Bishopsgate and beyond”, “Historic Southwark” and “London Wall” standard walks, and on our  “Tudor and Stuart London”, “Tudor and Stuart City Highlights”, “Lost City Highlights” and “Rebellious London” themed specials.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Our Guided Walks” section of our web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

“Pride’s Purge” (1648)

On this day in 1648, during the English Civil War, the Parliamentarian Colonel Thomas Pride expelled over one hundred Presbyterian Royalist Members of Parliament from the Houses of Parliament, in what became known as “Pride’s Purge”.

Pride's purge - Copy

The remaining Members, constituting the “Rump Parliament”, then instigated the legal proceedings against the king, Charles I, that led to his trial for treason, and eventually to his execution.

The execution of Charles I - Copy

The Palace of Westminster – including the  rebuilt Houses of Parliament  – is  visited on our “St Paul’s to Westminster Abbey” standard walk, and on our “Medieval London”, “Tudor and Stuart London”, “Legal London” and “Rebellious London” themed specials.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Our Guided Walks” section of this web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

Civil War and Commonwealth

May 19thAccording to Peter de Loriol’s endlessly fascinating “The London Book of Days”, on this day in 1649,  at what was effectively the end of the Civil War, “the Rump Parliament passed an Act … which created all people of the realm and territories of England a Commonwealth and Free State where Parliament would constitute the officers and ministers of the people without any kings or lords”.

Civil War Lines of Communication plaque, Spital Square

Civil War Lines of Communication plaque, previously in Spital Square (current fate unknown)

Site of Civil War fort, Borough High Street

Site of Civil War fort, Borough High Street

Site of execution of Charles I, Banqueting House, Whitehall

Site of execution of Charles I, Banqueting House, Whitehall

St Charles King & Martyr banner, church of St Katharine Cree

St Charles King & Martyr banner, church of St Katharine Cree

Various sites associated with the Civil War and Commonwealth are visited on our “London Wall”, “St Paul’s to Westminster Abbey”, “Aldgate, Bishopsgate and beyond” and “Historic Southwark” standard walks, and on our “Lost City Highlights”, “Tudor and Stuart London” and “Rebellious London” themed specials.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Guided Walks” section of our web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

“Pride’s purge” (1648)

December 6th On this day in 1648, the Parliamentarian Colonel Thomas Pride expelled over one hundred Presbyterian Royalist Members of Parliament from the Houses of Parliament, in what became known as “Pride’s Purge”.

Pride's purge

Pride’s purge

The remaining Members, constituting the “Rump Parliament”, then instigated the legal proceedings against the king, Charles I, that led to his trial for treason, and eventually to his execution.

The execution of Charles I

The execution of Charles I

Civil War and Commonwealth

May 19thAccording to Peter de Loriol’s endlessly fascinating “The London Book of Days”, on this day in 1649,  at what was effectively the end of the Civil War, “the Rump Parliament passed an Act … which created all people of the realm and territories of England a Commonwealth and Free State where Parliament would constitute the officers and ministers of the people without any kings or lords”.

Civil War Lines of Communication plaque, Spital Square

Civil War Lines of Communication plaque, previously in Spital Square (current fate unknown)

Site of Civil War fort, Borough High Street

Site of Civil War fort, Borough High Street

Site of execution of Charles I, Banqueting House, Whitehall

Site of execution of Charles I, Banqueting House, Whitehall

St Charles King & Martyr banner, church of St Katharine Cree

St Charles King & Martyr banner, church of St Katharine Cree

Various sites associated with the Civil War and Commonwealth are visited on our “London Wall”, “St Paul’s to Westminster Abbey”, “Aldgate, Bishopsgate and beyond” and “Historic Southwark” standard walks, and on our “Lost City Highlights”, “Tudor and Stuart London” and “Rebellious London” themed specials.

Further details of all our walks are available in the “Our Guided Walks” section of our web-site.

Bookings may be made through the “Contact/Booking” section of the web-site, by e-mail (lostcityoflondon@sky.com), or by phone (020-8998-3051).

Civil War and Commonwealth

19th May – According to Peter de Loriol’s endlessly fascinating  “The London Book of Days”, on this day in 1649,  at what was effectively the end of the Civil War, “the Rump Parliament passed an Act … which created all people of the realm and territories of England a Commonwealth and Free State where Parliament would constitute the officers and ministers of the people without any kings or lords”.
The Civil War is covered on our Thursday morning walk “Aldgate, Bishopsgate and beyond – Priories and Play-Houses”.
Civil War Lines of Communication, Spital Square(update November 2013 – sadly this display is no longer to be found)
(Photograph by Bob Jones)
To book a place on the Thursday morning walk, please email lostcityoflondon@sky.com
or ring 020 8998 3051
Further information about this and other walks is available from other parts of our website www.lostcityoflondon.co.uk
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